7 Ways White Jesus Perpetuates White Supremacy
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7 Ways White Jesus Perpetuates White Supremacy

For many white folk, the image of Christ as a white man is normal. Portraits by the famous artist, Warren Sallman, hang in many churches and households instilling the image of the white Jesus in the minds of many church members. When a Google search is conducted to find images of Christ, stock photos and webpages fill the search results with images of a whitewashed Christ that, again, perpetuates how we see the Savior of our world.
Jesus’ depiction as a white man is not only false, but it is a sin. These false artistic depictions perpetuate, intentionally, the oppressive violence and power hungry motives of white supremacy. Here are just 7 Ways White Jesus Perpetuates White Supremacy:
White Jesus whitewashes the Brown Jesus. The whiteness of the falsely created white Jesus erases the Brownness of the actual Christ who dwelt among humanity. The humanity of Christ was lived out as a brown person with a certain culture and a certain time and space. As we believe in the incarnation, we..

Setting the Table, Moving Forward, and ‘Not Going Anywhere’
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Setting the Table, Moving Forward, and ‘Not Going Anywhere’

HISTORICAL JOURNEY
The beginnings and journey of Knox Presbyterian Church reveal a church community with a defiant hope and a tenacious faith to overcome all odds to be followers of Jesus Christ.
Knox was started in 1926 as a mission to address the great Black migration from the south to the North. My own family moved from Chester, South Carolina to Baltimore in that migration.
My parents were products of Brainard Institute, a missionary effort started by Presbyterians in South Carolina. They and my grandparents settled in East Baltimore and were some of the first members of the fledgling missional Knox church.
At a time when Black Presbyterian ministers were primarily trained at the two Black Presbyterian seminaries, Johnson C Smith and Lincoln University, the church chose a young man of 26 years by the name of Herman Octavius Graham, relatively new to our shores from Jamaica.
He was chosen to start the effort with little to no resources and there was still much debate then abou..

LOOKING BACK ON 40 YEARS IN THE PCUSA: The Risks and Rewards of doing Sex and Gender Justice
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LOOKING BACK ON 40 YEARS IN THE PCUSA: The Risks and Rewards of doing Sex and Gender Justice

This is a personal story about what it means to be part of a movement to change the attitudes of a denomination and our nation, particularly on matters of women’s rights and human sexuality. I write to encourage people to consider serving on national committees, and to encourage the church to retain a strong Presbyterian system of social justice committees and the development of carefully prepared reports and policy. I mourn the vocations sacrificed in years of moral and theological clashes, and applaud the words spoken today (June 4, 2020) by the Rev. J. Herbert Nelson, Stated Clerk of the General Assembly of the PCUSA: “No longer can we hide behind not being controversial.”
Forty years ago, 1980, I was elected by the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (UPCUSA) to serve on the relatively new Council on Women and the Church (COWAC). Fast forward to 2020. I’m saying goodbye to national service after four years as a member of the PCUSA Advisory Committee on Social Witness Policy (..

Setting the Inner Compass: June Column
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Setting the Inner Compass: June Column

Reading poetry is one of the ways some of us nourish our faith, a way we set or reset our inner compass and stay focused on the big picture, on the spiritual journey. I know that is true for me. The time that has passed since the May poetry column has been a season of overwhelming sadness, anger, and a call to action. The systemic racism in this country and our church has never been more apparent. The Langston Hughes poem, “Harlem”, has echoed in my heart the past few weeks. It begins with a question: “What happens to a dream deferred?” It continues, “Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore—And then run?” The poem concludes, “Or does it explode?” Yes, it explodes. We have work to do. Inner work and joining with others for social change.
Wendell Berry begins his “Peace of Wild Things” with the line: “When despair for the world grows in me.” These lines resonate with the first half of 2020. There is much that causes us to feel despair. It is easy to feel overwhel..

5 Reasons for Racial Affinity Groups in Anti-Racism Work
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5 Reasons for Racial Affinity Groups in Anti-Racism Work

Anti-racism work and training is by no means work that needs to be done in silos. But when it comes to dismantling white supremacy and racism, white people and people of color have different work to do. This means that white people need to do the work separate from their siblings of color before any type of reconciliation happens. Here are just 5 reasons why separating into race based affinity groups is important for anti-racist work.
People of color need spaces to grieve, lament, mourn, and share their emotions in community away from white people.
White people tend to take up excess space as well as center conversation around themselves. People of color, gathering together in their own spaces, may find more freedom and trust to do the work they need to do in processing.White people created white supremacy so white people need to do the work to dismantle it.
White supremacy is a white people’s problem and it is going to take white people’s intentional efforts to dismantle white supr..

I Can’t Breathe: Systematic Police Brutality in the United States
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I Can’t Breathe: Systematic Police Brutality in the United States

Minneapolis, in full light of day, George Floyd, an African American man, age 46 was lynched by a police officer of European descent. His execution was transmitted live on Facebook and has led to a global movement fighting against police brutality and ongoing impacts of polices and laws designed to protect and support European descendants.
George Floyd was handcuffed and laid on the street with his head to one side. The police officer, Derek Chauvin, had his knee around his neck and two other officers were holding him by the waist and legs for over eight minutes. George Floyd’s final words were “Please, please, please, I can’t breathe. My stomach hurts. My neck hurts. Please, please. I can’t breathe.” The police officers continued to hold him until the ambulance arrived to verify his death. This murder comes amid multiple news reports of other African Americans who were also killed by police in the United States.
SAN JOSE, CA – MAY 29: A protester takes a knee in front of San Jose ..

CRISIS MINISTRY CAPACITY: Now is the time to build more of it.
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CRISIS MINISTRY CAPACITY: Now is the time to build more of it.

“Don’t just do something, stand there.” The first thing to do in a crisis or even disaster is not to panic. This is not “fight, flight, or paralysis,” but steadiness, rooted in the inner security of faith. A national or international crisis is something that it helps to have a denomination to address, and an ecumenical movement. More than a disaster, a crisis or multiple crises requires more than sending money. It means aligning with those who seek a solution, and it may mean standing-symbolically and actually—with protesters and whistle-blowers. It means analyzing the obstacles to social change, which usually has a long range dimension.
In the current police accountability crisis, for example, Presbyterians may be helped to know that the General Assembly has endorsed peaceful protest and civil disobedience when necessary, and has called for de-militarizing (though not de-funding) the police. It has also, in the resolution, Honest Patriotism, identified the slow-motion crisis of lies..

Moving on in Our Faith
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Moving on in Our Faith

There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don’t look even slightly believable. If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn’t anything embarrassing hidden in the middle...

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